Nitrogen Oxides Detection (NOx)

Application areas of laser-based nitrogen oxide detection

nanoplus lasers for nitrogen oxide detection are used for various applications including:

  • Environment: Emission control
  • Health: Breath gas analysis
  • Health: Monitoring of medical gas

Tunable diode laser spectroscopy allows measuring NOx with up to ppb precision in real time and in situ. Providing long-term stability and requiring little maintenance, nanoplus lasers are suitable for operation in harsh environments.

Standard wavelengths for nitrogen oxide detection

nanoplus offers various wavelengths to target the vibrational-rotational bands of nitrogen oxides. Literature recommends the following wavelengths for nitrogen oxides detection:

Select your wavelength for nitrogen oxide detection

Above wavelengths as well as further customized wavelengths for the detection of nitrogen oxides are available from nanoplus.

When you choose your wavelength, you have to consider your product set up, environment and nature of the measurement.

These factors influence the optimum wavelength for your application. Do have a look at the Hitran Database to further evaluate your choice of wavelengths. Our application experts are equally happy to discuss with you the most suitable wavelength for your application.

Let us know the wavelength you require with an accuracy of 0.1 nm!

Figure 1: Absorption features of nitrogen oxides in the 0.76 µm to 6.0 µm range
Absorption features of nitrogen oxides in 760 nm to 6000 nm range

Related information for laser-based nitrogen oxide detection

Specifications & Mountings

Applications

Papers & Links

The following tables analyse the typical specifications of the standard wavelengths for NOx detection.

electro-optical properties of
1814.0 nm DFB laser diode
symbolunitminimumtypicalmaximum
standard wavelengthλnm1814.0
absorption line strengthScm / mol∼ 5 x 10-23
output powerpoutmW5
threshold currentlthmA203565
current tuning coefficientcTnm / mA0.0080.020.03
temperature tuning coefficientcInm / K0.070.10.14
mode hop free tuning rangeΔλnm+/- 0.5
electro-optical properties of
2670.0 nm DFB laser diode
symbolunitminimumtypicalmaximum
standard wavelengthλnm2670.0
absorption line strengthScm / mol∼ 4 x 10-22
output powerpoutmW2
threshold currentlthmA305080
current tuning coefficientcTnm / mA0.010.020.05
temperature tuning coefficientcInm / K0.150.20.28
mode hop free tuning rangeΔλnm+/- 0.5
electro-optical properties of
2860.0 nm DFB laser diode
symbolunitminimumtypicalmaximum
standard wavelengthλnm2860.0
absorption line strengthScm / mol∼ 5 x 10-20
output powerpoutmW2
threshold currentlthmA305080
current tuning coefficientcTnm / mA0.010.020.05
temperature tuning coefficientcInm / K0.150.20.28
mode hop free tuning rangeΔλnm+/- 0.5
electro-optical properties of
3420.0 nm DFB interband cascade laser
symbolunitminimumtypicalmaximum
standard wavelengthλnm3420.0
absorption line strengthScm / mol∼ 7 x 10-21
output powerpoutmW> 1
threshold currentlthmA50
current tuning coefficientcTnm / mA0.2
temperature tuning coefficientcInm / K0.3
mode hop free tuning rangeΔλnm+/- 0.5
electro-optical properties of
4470.0 nm DFB interband cascade laser
symbolunitminimumtypicalmaximum
standard wavelengthλnm4470.0
absorption line strengthScm / mol∼ 1 x 10-18
output powerpoutmW> 1
threshold currentlthmA50
current tuning coefficientcTnm / mA0.2
temperature tuning coefficientcInm / K0.3
mode hop free tuning rangeΔλnm+/- 0.5
electro-optical properties of
5255.0 nm DFB interband cascade laser
symbolunitminimumtypicalmaximum
standard wavelengthλnm5255.0
absorption line strengthScm / mol∼ 3 x 10-20
output powerpoutmW> 1
threshold currentlthmA50
current tuning coefficientcTnm / mA0.2
temperature tuning coefficientcInm / K0.3
mode hop free tuning rangeΔλnm+/- 0.5
mounting options /
technical drawings
wavelengthTECcap with windowAR cap with AR windowfiberheatsinkcollimation
TO5.6 760 nm - 3000 nmNANANANANA
TO5 760 nm - 3000 nmNANA
TO663000 nm - 6000 nmNANA
c-mount 760 nm - 3000 nmNANANANANANA
SM-BTF760 nm - 2360 nmNANAsingle modeNANA
PM-BTF1064 nm - 2050 nmNANApolarization maintainingNANA

Ask for further packages.

Please find below a number of application samples.

Emission control of flue gases: NOx
NOx is produced during fuel combustion at power plants and other industrial facilities. When it reacts with SO2 it causes acid rain. For this reason NOx and SO2 emissions are restricted and need to be monitored. [67]

Monitoring of breath gas: NOx
The field of breath analysis considers NOx as a biomarker for asthma and other pulmonary diseases. This new technology becomes more established for clinical applications. It is a cost-effective and non-invasive method of diagnosis and treatment monitoring. [49]

Emission control of exhaust fumes: CO2 and NOx
Guided by environmental policies, the automobile industry is concerned to reduce the carbon footprint of vehicles. Automotive suppliers develop innovative combustion engines to control CO2 and NOx concentration in exhaust fumes.

Please find below a selection of related papers from our literature list.

Let us know if you published a paper with our lasers. We will be happy to include it in our literature list.

#9 DFB Lasers Between 760 nm and 16 µm for Sensing Applications;
W. Zeller, L. Naehle, P. Fuchs, F. Gerschuetz, L. Hildebrandt, J. Koeth, Sensors 2010, 10, pp. 2492-2510.

#11 Quantum cascade laser linewidth investigations for high resolution photoacoustic spectroscopy;
M. Germer, M. Wolff, Appl. Opt. 48, 4, 2009, pp. B80-B86.

#18 Monomode Interband Cascade Lasers at 5.2 µm for Nitric Oxide Sensing;
M. von Edlinger, J. Scheuermann, R. Weih, C. Zimmermann, L. Naehle, M. Fischer, J. Koeth, IEEE Phot. Tech. Lett., 26, 5, 2014, pp. 480-482.

#31 QCL based NO Detection;
M. Wolff, J. Koeth, L. Hildebrandt, P. Fuchs; 16th International Conference on Photoacoustic and Photothermal Phenomena.

#49 Spectroscopic monitoring of NO traces in plants and human breath: applications and perspectives;
S. M. Cristescu, D. Marchenko, J. Mandon, K. Hebelstrup, G. W. Griffith, L. A. J. Mur, F. J. M. Harren, Appl. Phys. B, 109, 3, Nov. 2012, pp. 203-211.

#50 Mid-IR difference frequency laser-based sensors for ambient CH4, CO, and N2O monitoring;
J. J. Scherer, J. B. Paul, H. J. Jost, Marc L. Fischer, Appl. Phys. B, 109, 3, Nov. 2012, pp. 271-277.

#67 New Opportunities in Mid-Infrared Emission Control;
P. Geiser, Sensors, 2015, pp. 22724-22736.